History

History

  • 2016Immigrant Integration Pathway
    Adult education providers, particularly ESL providers, play a central role in welcoming immigrants and refugees into their communities. In 2016, ALLIES initiated the Immigrant Integration Pathway (IIP) project, an innovative way to identify and measure the critical factors for successful immigrant integration.
  • 2015CBO Collaboration Mini-Grants
    ALLIES invested in collaboration with CBOs by coordinating mini-grants to four regional leadership teams of CBO and adult school/community college representatives. Teams worked on asset-mapping and relationship building (South Bay), inventorying childcare services (San Mateo), common intake and assessment tools (South Santa Clara County) and student transitions (North Santa Clara County).
  • 2014Adult Education Block Grant
    In 2014, AB86 moved into the implementation phase with the passing of AB104, or the Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG), restoring $500M in annual funding to adult education in California. 72 AEBG consortia (made up of adult schools and community colleges) across the state are working on implementing AB86 legislation and making seamless transitions between adult schools and community colleges a reality for adult learners. As consortia actively seek out partnerships with community organizations, ALLIES continues to play a role in connecting and convening partners in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.
  • 2013Digital Literacy Mini-Grants
    In 2013, ALLIES awarded 12 mini-grants of $1,500 to $2,500 to improve the digital literacy of English language learners. In total, almost $29,000 worth of grants were given to three colleges, eight adult schools and one community-based organization. The grants fell into several broad categories: student digital literacy projects, professional development projects, and institutional development projects.
  • 2013-presentAB 86 and Adult Education Block Grant
    ALLIES and its partners played an active role in the development of Assembly Bill 86 (AB 86). AB 86, approved in July 2013, calls for integrated plans from regional consortia of community colleges, adult schools, and other partners to close gaps between needs and services, integrate programs and create seamless transitions to post-secondary education or the workforce, accelerate student progress toward academic and career goals using proven best-practices, provide professional development to support program integration and student success, and leverage existing regional structures. During the development of the bill, ALLIES Steering Committee members provided testimony and other input to legislative committees to influence the drafting of the AB 86 Adult Education Program.
  • 2012Silicon Valley ALLIES
    In 2012, ALLIES partnered with the region’s Workforce Investment Boards to launch a major new initiative. Silicon Valley ALLIES connected immigrant adults requiring English-language acquisition, work readiness, and career-technical training to career pathways in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. With funding from a U.S. Department of Labor Workforce Innovation Fund Grant, the Silicon Valley ALLIES partners initiated development of a collective impact model that focuses on maximizing the contributions of adult English learners to the regional economy. Silicon Valley ALLIES brought together Workforce Investment Boards, business, labor, philanthropy, community colleges, adult schools, and community based organizations.
  • 2011ESL Provider Network
    Since its inception, one of ALLIES most important activities has been to coordinate the ESL Provider Network (EPN), a coalition of ESL providers from San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. The EPN meets together twice a year to share best practices and discuss future directions for the overall ALLIES effort. Local partners collaborate between sessions on specific partnership initiatives.
  • 2010Creation Of ALLIES
    In 2010, the Silicon Valley Community Foundation catalyzed the creation of ALLIES to support innovative approaches to collaboration that build pathways between adult schools and community colleges. ALLIES’ core participants were ESL providers from the adult schools, community colleges, and community groups. ALLIES became a 501(c)3 nonprofit in 2012, led by a board of directors and consulting staff.